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Case Studies Filming HERO docs News PhotoRoute Uncategorized Word-Bank

Combat abuse by making policy for young people

Allegations of child abuse in the media is sickening – we need to share our knowledge of basic Human Rights with children by delivering policy in formats accessible to them.

Knowledge is power

Policy documents are often written by highly educated professionals in highly educated professional-speak, and generally not in the language used by the people they are designed to protect.

The delivery of policy documents needs to change to be part of mainstream information provision. How often do people actually read policy documents, from start to finish? We have so many formats available to us, that appeal to young people, those with English as a second language, people with cognitive difficulties, in short, any vulnerable groups, those who really need protecting. Policy documents should literally ‘speak’ to them, they should be memorable, how else can people be protected by them?

Tools to help

1. Convert policy documents into an easy read format

This means having meaningful use of images to support sentence structure and using a common language (without loosing legal context).THFC-safegaurd-small

Use tools like HERO docs (Healthcare Easy Read Online) to convert policy into easy read

Live example visit www.HEROdocs.com

2. Publish policy in mobile friendly formats

Do you read PDF’s on your phone, personally I’ve lost interest after scrolling across the first paragraph.
Publish policies as a normal web page – don’t hide them in PDF or Word Doc attachments.

3. Add Word-Bank to your site

Word-Bank definitions add comprehension to your website content (can also be added to individual policy pages). Word-Bank won a BBC innovation lab award for aiding those that could fall through the information gaps and our technological approach.Live example visit www.hrch.nhs.uk/about-us/
Or Word-Bank FAQs for more information.

4. Creating an animated (easy read) film

This is a great way to make complex subjects accessible. An example being NHS Englands national Continuing Healthcare film (created with Greenwich CCG).
Continuing Healthcare is sometimes known as end of life care, it’s when our health needs change when having illnesses such as cancer and being able to access addition budgets that are fairly much unlimited.
The policy has a legal context, it was published then copied and pasted across NHS websites but the policy was too complex for time poor health professionals to understand and then be able to impart to patients and families.

We worked with the policy writers to create an easier-to-read script of the policy and create an animated film.
For improved accessibility we:

  • published the script of the film in website text for those preferring to read (such as those using screen readers) and have the additional benefit of Word-Bank definitions.
  • theres nothing spoken in the film thats not displayed graphically and vice verse
  • the film has voice over and it’s also captioned

Live example: www.enabledcity.chc/ or  NHS England’s CHC policy that the film was made from

Animation is very effective and also worth considering how widely it can be used – NHS England’s national version is freely available and it can be localised with own staff intro’s and outros

Animated example of Transforming Care programme

5. Review your contact us page

Its also worth reviewing your contact us section of your website, can the copy be improved? Would using transport symbols and a map help people with low literacy report abuse in person – such is best practice for Patient Advice Liaison Service in NHS (NHS complaints service). Use PhotoRoute to remove barriers to independent travel.

See how Tottenham Hotpsur Foundation removes independent travel barriers
Contact us for more information

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Awards Case Studies News PhotoRoute Uncategorized

Hotspur Foundation removes independent travel barriers

Tottenham Hotspur Foundation have received funding from the Premier League Charitable fund to roll out the new PhotoRoute service across their patch, expected outcomes include:

  • Removing independent travel barriers (the minimal requirement to go on a Hotspur Foundation course)
  • People with disabilities gaining work based skills from co-creating maps with Hotspur Foundation staff
  • Enabling students with Special Educational Needs to make healthier lifestyle choices and gain independence
  • Excellent customer service provision for wider community

PhotoRoute was developed from Visit London gold awarded expertise and experience of supplying 2 London 2012 Paralympic projects. This software streamlines map creation and sharing of maps while adding accessibility features.
Earlier work with the Hotspur Foundation includes developing a Travel Training Course and a way-finding app for the club…

“The Club is constantly looking at ways in which it can enhance the matchday experience for fans. Tottenham Hotspur FC match day experienceWe believe that offering the PhotoRoute service will ease navigation in and around White Hart Lane for all supporters, especially those with disabilities.

By working closely with our award-winning Foundation, and liaising with the Tottenham Hotspur Disabled Association, the Club is confident it can address the needs of its disabled supporters and continue to ensure the fantastic matchday experience is inclusive of all fans.”
Jonathan Waite, Customer Services Manager

 Embedded client page – www.photoroute.com/clients

Embedded view with print options

Learn about the new PhotoRoute system or join our mailing list.

See earlier match day experience maps used by Tottenham Hotspur FC.

 

Categories
Case Studies HERO docs News PhotoRoute Word-Bank

Accessible Information Standard Myth Buster

13 Myths of the Accessible Information Standard

Download NHS England’s Accessible Information Standard Myth Buster (powerpoint) to bust the below myths..

Myth #1 “If someone can’t read a letter because they’re blind, there’s no point sending them an email or a text message!”

Reality #1

  • A person who is blind may be able to access information sent via email and / or text message but not in a printed letter.
  • Many people who are blind or have visual loss use assistive technology such as ‘screen readers’ which convert text to speech or audio. This means that email and text message (and in some circumstances a letter sent as an email attachment), can be accessible formats for some people who are blind or have visual loss.
  • However, some people who are blind, especially older people who are more likely to be digitally excluded, will not be able to use email or text message, and so accessibility cannot be assumed.
  • The answer? Don’t make any assumptions – always ask people what formats and communication methods work for them – you might be surprised!

Myth #2 “Everyone with a learning disability will need support from a carer or family member at appointments.”

Reality #2

  • It should not be assumed or expected that a person with a learning disability will be, or will need to be, ‘accompanied’ at appointments.
  • Although everyone with a learning disability is likely to need some support to access information and communicate effectively, the type of support needed by individuals varies significantly.
  • Many individuals with a mild or moderate learning disability may be able to live and access services independently.
  • In line with the Mental Capacity Act 2005, everyone should be supported to be involved in decision making as much as they are able.
  • Some people with a learning disability will need support from an advocate at appointments.

Download NHS England’s Accessible Information Standard Myth Buster (powerpoint)

Useful resources:

  • HERO docs (Healthcare Easy Read Online), developed with NHS Englands’ AIS team and other leading providers
  • Word-Bank, automated jargon buster for health and social care websites
  • PhotoRoute, our Paralympic & Premier League way finding tool (developed from travel training concepts)
  • Animated films created with the NHS

To find out more about the Accessible Information Standard visit the NHS England website here: www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/accessibleinfo/

Categories
Case Studies Filming News Uncategorized

Transforming Care

Enabled City has worked with Local Government Association to create 7 films about the Transforming Care Programme. The films show how Transforming Care improves peoples lives.
For background information follow this link to or how to add films to to your website.

Empowerment films – what empowerment means to me

Transforming Care is all about improving the lives of people with learning disability and/or autism who display behaviours that are described as challenging. We know that when people are empowered to live the way they chose and are involved in planning their support and care they have better lives.

The Local Government Association leads the empowerment workstream for the Transforming Care Programme. To support the workstream the LGA has set up an empowerment steering group to oversee the work.
Members of the empowerment steering group are all experts by experience. They all have experience of long stays in hospital, or have family members with experience.
Members of the group are now living good lives in the community and have worked together to develop a film about what being empowered means to them.

1. Introduction

2. Transforming care summary film

You can watch the group’s empowerment film here.

3. Phill & Josh’s’s story

Phill gives his perspective of Josh’s move home to Cornwall. In the film Phill describes how the whole family has been empowered as a result of the good support that Josh is getting in the community.

4. Lucy’s story

Lucy and her Mum describe how Lucy has been empowered to live the life she wants, including through choosing her own home and her own staff team, and learning to travel independently.

5. Peter’s story

Peter talks about being empowered to live the life he wants, including through choosing his own home and décor, looking after his pets and being able to get out and about when he wants to.

6. Jason’s story

Jason talks about his role as a self-advocate and the importance of people with a learning disability being empowered to have a voice. He talks about being able to do the things that he likes to do and feels proud of his achievements.

7. Derek’s story

Derek talks about the importance of having the right support around him so that he can live independently and stay safe and well. He is empowered to live the life he wants and has a job that he enjoys and opportunities to learn new skills.

For more information visit www.local.gov.uk/transforming-care